Gringo Gazette

Gringo Gazette

Mexican Gas Stations Seeing Changes

Costco opened its first gas station in the state of Guanajuato this week, its fourth in Mexico. The spiffy new station cost $3.3 million. They’re selling Costco’s Kirkland Signature gasoline brand, and sure it comes from the States, but so does most gas. Mexico has very little refining capabilities. Maybe that goes a long way toward explaining the cost of a gallon of gas costing about $3.65 a gallon.

The company assured customers that they will get what they pay for and won’t be short-poured here. Yes, he actually said that, acknowledging the elephant in the room where gas is sold. They will only accept credit or debit cards and members who use their Costco credit card get a 3% discount.

Meanwhile, The British oil and gas company BP continues its expansion into Mexico by opening its first ToGo convenience store in this country, where it also introduced its Wild Bean Café to customers. This station is in Guadalajara. The new store and its coffee is part of a strategy to transform the concept of service stations in Mexico, now that stations other than Pemex are allowed. BP operates the Wild Bean Café brand in 1,200 convenience stores in 11 countries. In Mexico, the company has more than 350 gas stations. And looking at the overall picture, it does appear that BP’s convenience store is a lot nicer than the OXXO’s.

Meanwhile, stodgy old Pemex appears to be running scared, as the government-owned oil company is sporting a new look. The new gas station design was officially inaugurated last week in the state of México. Poo. Always at the end of the line, Baja doesn’t get anything cool.

The head of the company’s industrial transformation division said the new design will be incorporated at 45 stations this year, eight new ones and 37 boring old stations will be renovated. Carlos Murrieta Cummings said the new concept “is intended to maintain the franchise’s leadership in the domestic market.” See? They just admitted they’re running scared.  “The new image breaks with the conventional and projects a new Pemex: a highly competitive business in an open market,” he said in the announcement.

Murrieta added that the new design reflects an eagle in flight, “a leader, strong and agile, with its wings extended towards new challenges.” Murrieta also said the company’s objective is to provide the highest standards of customer service, offering its clients experience, reliability, modernity and innovation. Ha ha ha! Since when? Since President Pena Nieto broke Pemex’s stranglehold on the gas monopoly and invited in competition! Since then they’re trying a tiny bit harder. They’re still short-pouring and short-changing, and they’re still losing buckets of money.

Well, the general manager of the first Pemex franchise to sport the new look did say its sales have doubled since the new design was incorporated in mid-June. With prices fixed, maybe appearances and service do count.

Santas Needed!

This is the time of year to be thinking about giving. If you are still looking for a group worthy of your hearts and thoughts this holiday season, please consider adopting a Kumiai (Kumeyaay) or other local family for Christmas. There are 65 families in the Kumiai community, an Indian reserve one hour into the hills above La Mision, and so many other families also in the hills that have no one to think about them.

Food boxes will feature chicken, fresh produce (purchased the day before delivery), and dry goods, priced at $20. Blankets are $10. Or you can make up your own gift box of food, goods, and gifts, and bring to one of the drop off locations. In return, you will receive a Christmas Thank You card and photo from the family you have helped. You are even invited to accompany Sara and group to San Jose de La Zorra to deliver the holiday gifts.

The deadline is near! The last day to adopt a local or Kumiai family is December 10! For additional information, contact Sara Vega at 661-850-4855 or email to saraenmovimiento@hotmail.com, or contact her on Facebook on either of the pages “Sara Vega” or “Sara.enmovimiento.”

There are several ways to donate to this philanthropic cause: Cash donations may be made through PayPal by contacting Sara at her email address. Or you may make a donation at any local OXXO, into the account 4766-8403-0084-5794. Save your donation receipt and send a photocopy to Sara so she knows whom to thank.

You may donate non-perishable food items, blankets, jackets, or any other winter-related item to either Charley’s Place (k 37) or Betty’s Burgers (on the boulevard just south of the 7-11 / cuota on and off ramps.

Anyone wishing to join the caravan to the Kumiai camp, contact Sara Vega ASAP for cabin reservations, instructions, and logistics of the trip.

The need of the people is great and varied. If you are building your own donation box and in need of suggestions, please contact Sara. Merry Christmas!

Anthony’s Bar Building On Fire Once Again

Yesterday morning a once popular bar in Ensenada caught fire for the second time, on its top floor, where it has several rooms for rent.

The fire was reportedly caused by a failure on the electrical wiring of the building. Local firemen where able to control it in a little less than an hour with no one injured.

Four years ago, on September 2, 2014, the same top floor of the building caught fire, at that time authorities said the fire could had been intentional, but no one was apprehended.

The bar, that was almost a landmark in Ensenada with its huge gorilla, has been out of business for a couple of years now.

Watch out for those Santa Ana winds

Health authorities from Baja are recommending staying at home when Santa Ana winds are active. Problems in the respiratory tract, eyes and skin have been reported during the winds, and thus they are recommending staying home with doors and windows closed.

Dr. David Perez, chief of medical services, stated that these winds affect the health because they carry a lot of dirt with them because of the severe dryness. He also recommended to stay away from street food during this condition, as it can get easily contaminated by pathogens in the wind and can induce gastric diseases.

Perez emphasized the importance of drinking enough water and making sure house pets have enough clean water, which should be changed more often to avoid having them drink contaminated liquids.

Do we really need more signs?

At least in Ensenada, authorities and business leaders think so. The third ENSENADA “letters” sign was officially inaugurated in the cruise ships terminal, focused on more national motifs than regional, since it’s almost exclusively going to be seen by cruisers. The sign features the agave plant, charros and the Aztec calendar.

The first one was installed in Playa Hermosa, featuring local animals; the second one, featuring a cruise ship and the cranes in the port, was placed in the “Ventana al Mar” Malecon.

Each of these signs is costing around $7,500 USD and the original project planned for 8, some in the city, one in San Quintin and other ones in the Guadalupe Valley.

The money is coming from a trust managed by local business people, called FIDEM, funded by the state government, through giving back 5% of all payroll taxes that businesses paid during the year.

There is one more sign at the entrance of Ensenada, but that one was placed in there by our tourism officials with federal funds, as they have done in most tourist cities in Mexico.

Should You Get Dentistry Here?

Mexico is touted as a great place to get dentistry done, and most of that touting is from the industry itself. But that doesn’t mean it’s not a great savings or it’s not safe, it just means slow down and do your due diligence. Find out who you’re going to trust your health to. Make no mistake, just because your mouth is kind of on the edge of your health, it is still your health. We know a woman who got a tooth so badly infected the pain went into her neck and shoulder and she went to a chiropractor, not even realizing the pain started in her mouth. It took her almost a year to find a doctor who figured out it was coming from an infection in a tooth she had had work done on in a Mexican border town.

The cost here is a fraction of what it is in the States, and you need to ask yourself why? OK, so we’re asking: Why? Because these dentists don’t carry insurance. Fine, if nothing goes wrong.

Another reason for cheap dentistry is they pay such low wages. As a friend and business owner told me when I complained about his lousy service, “Sorry about that but I pay peanuts, so I get monkeys.” Do you want someone making way less than $1000 a month drilling holes in your gums? Fine, that’s understandable. Dentistry is costly, we get that.

Reason three that dentistry is cheaper here is that most Mexicans can’t afford to pay even the price you think is so cheap. Therefore, dentists are hungry for business from foreigners. The price you’re chortling over is a godsend to them.

Do they have the same training as US dentists? No.

There were 83 dental schools registered in the last official national count in 2007. Half are public, half are private. Admission to dental schools in Mexico requires a high school diploma, and to obtain a license in Mexico, dental students must complete a 3 to 5 year program plus a year of community service. But this  is scary: No formal nationwide standard curriculum exists, so who knows if your dentist went to a Mickey Mouse stay and vay or to a tough school where they had to learn their craft? And did you just notice we said that dentists here have four fewer years of school than US dentists? Of course a case can be made that those four years our dentists spend in college before they get to dental school are wasted since they never see a tooth.

There are 195,000 dentists in the US, and 153,000 dentists in Mexico. There are 312 million Americans and 129 million Mexicans. Clearly there are too many dentists here, especially considering how many of the very poor people never open wide for a dentist.

So, why are so many Mexican dentists trained in the United States? Look closer to that diploma on the wall they’re so proud of, especially if it says graduated from a US school. Most of them are a course lasting a week or two on a specialty. No doubt the dentist wants to improve his craft, but being able to say he’s US trained makes that couple weeks a very good investment.

And who over sees dentists in Mexico? Nobody. In the US, a dentist must pass three tests in the state he/she intends to practice in and show a hepatitis B test, finger prints, a course in infection control, and oh yes, “be of good character” whatever that entails. And they belong to the American Dental Ass., a trade organization where you can start the process of complaint.

Good luck suing a Mexican dentist if something goes wrong. There is no tort law in this country. (Tort law provides relief to injured parties for harms caused by others, and to impose liability on parties responsible for the harm).

All of this sounds negative and is not meant to be, it’s just a counter point to the one big, huge, and very good reason to get dentistry done here: Price. You can save a bundle.

Big Fines for Small Tools

Drones can invade privacy, they can cause accidents, they annoy birds, and they can really piss off pilots in actual airplanes. They can also be incredible tools for scientists, photographers, and anyone in the tourism industry. In some countries, licenses are required. The International Civil Aviation Organization insists on a license too. And, of course, there are regulations. But that doesn’t stop anyone from buying a drone off the internet, and those drones are high-tech.

For example, the DJI Phantom 4 is a model from a few years ago but still very popular. It fits into a piece of hand luggage. It has the ability to fly 20 meters per second, reach 6000 meters above sea level, and fly for about half an hour on a single battery. The drone costs around 840 USD. The DJI Inspire 2 is an up-to-date professional machine. It also has a flight time of about  half an hour, but a range of 7 km and a max speed of 58 mph. Inspire 2 costs a little over 2,700 USD. As tools, these drones have great potential. Their cameras are capable of getting great still shots as well as video.  Mexico has some rules on the books in regard to flying drones, but now the government is pushing ahead, full throttle.

New regulations, which go into effect in December this year, will require all drone users to obtain a license. However, getting that license might be tricky. First, you must be 18 years or older, then you need to be Mexican by birth (sorry Gringos), you need to provide your military release card, have a high school diploma, and be in good health. If those rules don’t sound ridiculous enough, then the fine that goes along with flying without a license (in a country that hardly gives out parking tickets), is enough to have you rolling on the floor.

If the police catch you flying, and you can’t show your license, you’ll be fined as much as 20,000 USD. Of course, you could probably give the officer a few 500 peso notes and a quick flight lesson and everyone will walk away with smiles.

The Mexican government has identified a problem: Drones have the capability of killing people in manned aircraft, so they are taking steps to solve the problem. But more than likely a cop will not even stop you, especially if you’re in the middle of the desert 100 kilometers from the nearest town. The police need to cover huge spaces with few resources (they most likely don’t have a drone).  Also, they probably have better things to do, like setting up speed traps to catch unsuspecting Gringos. Although it might not be completely necessary, it’s always good to follow the rules when in another country. And that’s our disclaimer.

What’s Going On In This Country?

Can you patent a recipe? Traditional Mixtec dishes from Oaxaca might soon be protected by a patent that has been requested by the Indigenous Peoples Development (CDI). A CDI representative in the Mixtec town of Silacayoápam, said the first stage of the cultural conservation project is to promote some staples of regional cuisine to a larger public. Gastronomic festivals have been used to develop this idea. They’ve had good progress; some recipes have already been documented, like those for the atoles (traditional hot corn and masa-based beverages), to Tepejillo, a thick pork-based sauce.

Once the cuisine of the Mixtec region and all of its dishes are fully recognizable by foodies, the CDI will move forward to formally register them. Another part of the registration process is taking place at the Teposcolula Institute of Technology, where gastronomy students are trying to formalize each of the Mixtec dishes’ recipes.

The CDI is also offering counsel and training to traditional Mixtec cooks, improving the presentation of their pre-Hispanic dishes while keeping them authentic. Wait a minute, improving or keeping them authentic? Does anyone else think this is odd? Maybe it’s just us. Did Aunt Jamima ever try to patent waffles? No. And she had something going there.

Druggies hedge income stream. A criminal organization known as the Tobacco Cartel is attempting to control Mexico’s cigarette market by eliminating from store shelves brands it doesn’t sell. Between January and September, police — or people posing as police — have carried out 364 operations at stores in eight states to seize and destroy cigarettes not distributed by the company Tobacco International Holdings (TIH).

Business owners and distributors of other cigarette brands were given fake letters from government departments such as the Federal Tax Administration (SAT) or the Federal Commission for Protection Against Sanitary Risk (Cofepris). The letters state that cigarette brands other than those distributed by TIH are illegal and cannot be sold in Mexico. Not true, you may pick your own poison.

Pueblo Magicos, again.  Todos Santos, in Baja Sur, has been chosen by the federal government to be a magic town, pueblo magico. Special? Not so much. There are now 121 magic towns all over Mexico. At the end of former President Calderón’s administration, a lot of new towns were included in the Pueblos Mágicos, despite not meeting the inclusion requirements. It’s very political. Some of the requirements are: There must be a municipal tourism department and the implementation of a tourism development plan. Each town receives US $260,000 in federal funding every year. Earlier this month the country got 10 new ones.

Mapimí, Durango, has seen the biggest improvement in terms of the well-being of citizens, with poverty levels cut from 61% in 2010 to 40% in 2015. Poverty also decreased significantly in Huicha, but Todos Santos hasn’t seen such progress. Well, maybe, they do get a lot of tourists; who knows if they know they are treading on magic ground?

Who do you trust? According to a study, more than 70% of Mexicans reported feeling unsafe in the streets of the neighborhood where they live and 80% said that they were aware of crimes such as assault, robbery, drug trafficking, shootings and homicides, taking place near their homes. Coneval that 62% of Mexicans are not happy with the neighborhood they live in and one in three people don’t trust their neighbors. Yikes, a bad place to be in when you don’t have a police department that plays heads up ball. And what cities have  any of those? Better love your neighbor, as you will never love your police.

Turn it around, Pedro. Central American migrants were arrested while walking or hitching rides in the southern state of Chiapas. Immigration officials and police blocked the migrants’ path with about 30 vehicles. Some succeeded in outrunning authorities while those detained were taken to a National Immigration Institute (INM) facility, where they were put on buses and taken to the airport. There, they were tossed aboard a Federal Police plane and flown to San Pedro Sula, Honduras.

The United States government is warning that its armed forces will fire guns on migrants who throw rocks at them, but in Mexico a kinder and gentler approach is coming. The incoming chief of the National Immigration Institute (INM) has vowed that Central American migrants will receive kinder attention during the administration of the incoming federal government. We’ll see how long that lasts, as some people in the migrant caravan tossed Molotov cocktails, rocks and sticks at the police. That can piss off anyone. But meanwhile, incoming immigration authorities are babbling on about migrants’ human rights.

The social sciences academic and former head of the College of the Northern Border, who was announced this week as the new INM chief, said that under Andrés Manuel López Obrador presidency, migrants won’t be stigmatized nor will their personal situations be ignored.

No more chicken fights. The Supreme Court has ruled that ban on cockfights by the Veracruz Congress two years ago is constitutional. The ruling said there were many benefits from the ban with regard to the animals’ well-being, protecting them from physical injury and even death. The state’s Animal Protection Act also prohibits hunting and capturing wild animals, fights between any animals, and displaying animals in circus shows.

Say, what? Mexicans’ command of English is on the decline, a new study shows. Mexico dropped 13 places to 57th of 88 countries on the 2018 EF English Proficiency Index (EPI). In Latin America, Mexico ranks ninth out of 17 countries behind Argentina, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Uruguay, Chile, Brazil, Guatemala and Panama.

This was attributed to overcrowded schools, low teacher wages, and inadequate teacher training.

Don’t bogart that joint. Mexico’s Supreme Court has issued two more rulings ordering that complainants in individual cases be allowed to use marijuana for recreational purposes, establishing a precedent that a blanket prohibition on pot is unconstitutional.

The court found that adults have a fundamental right to personal development which lets them decide their recreational activities without interference from the state.

We’re talking personal consumption, not all out commercialization. The rulings do not even technically legalize recreational use, however. They establish that courts must allow it, but it is still up to each individual to press his or her case in the judicial system.

Mexico saw something similar happen in recent years with five Supreme Court rulings establishing a broader precedent allowing same-sex couples to wed, though same-sex marriage has yet to become the law of the land nationwide.

Rosarito Calendar Of Events

Every Monday through Thursday, 9am – 12pm; Pickleball at Punta Azul Tennis Center. Cos: $1 court fee per person per day. Organized by Robert Canaan. BYO paddle and ball. Information: Facebook.com/ Rosarito Pickleball

Every Sunday 4 pm. Cultural Sundays in the park. Local Mexican and American dancers and musicians.  At the IMAC in Abelardo L. Rodriguez park, west of Banamex. Facebook IMAC Rosarito. Free.

Every Sunday 2 – 4 pm at the IMAC Central Park (behind the Banamex on Juarez) Dancing for seniors. Salsa and merengue (among others) tunes designed to not throw out a hip. www.facebook.com/IMAC Rosarito

Second Sunday of every month, Pet sterilization by the Baja Spay and Neuter Foundation at the Centro de Diagnostico Clinico Vetrinario, ave. Queretaro #2331-3, Col Cacho, Tijuana. 200 pesos, 661-124-3619, or Robin at www.BajaSpayNeuter.org.

Last Sunday of every month, Jewish Chavurah. Gordon Kane – gordonmkane@gmail.com.

Every Monday, 10:45 am, duplicate bridge at Baja Gold Bridge Club, KM 42 at the Rosarito Beach Christian Church. bajagoldcoastbridgeclub@gmail.com.

Every Tuesday – Rotary Club meets at Rosarito Beach Hotel. 664-376-2620.

Every Tuesday 10am to 11am.  Chair Yoga – Rosarito Wellness, Healing, Living at IMAC Park, room 1 in Rosarito (behind Banamex). Improve Balance & Coordination.  Receive all the benefits of yoga in a gentle, Healing, Meditative yoga class where a chair is used for support and balance. Bring water, small towel and comfortable clothing. Instructor: Erendira Abel, Certified Holistic Health Specialist. $5 per class, paid at beginning of month. For registration and location:  (661) 614-6036 Mexico or (619) 632-2965 US. Email: wellnesshealingliving@gmail.com

Every Tuesday. 9:00 am. Board Meeting for Yo Amo Rosarito at Ortega’s Buffet. See what events are under consideration or volunteer to help plan and run upcoming events.

Every Wednesday, 7:30 – 9:00 am; Tai Chi classes with certified instructor Eugenio Encinas at Galeria Fausto Polanco Rosarito. 350 pesos per month. Alyce: 664-368-6733; Alberto: 661-125-9191.

Every Second Wednesday (except December). 10 am. Friends of the Library meeting at main library of IMAC building next to Abelardo Rodríguez Park. Promotes reading and literacy in Rosarito. www.friendsofthelibrary.com.mx. 661-612-3659.

Second and FourthWednesday, 1 pm; Cruz Roja Primo Tapia Bingo at El Pescador Restaurant. 6 games/ 2 cards for $5. Reduced price menu; Jamesphausmann@gmail.com; 1-623-217-9795.

Every Second Wednesday OR the Wednesday prior to the Second Saturday (except December); Flying Samaritan’s General Meeting at Rene’s Casino (k28) at 1:30. Come early and enjoy lunch! www.flyingsamaritansrosarito.org; Susan Smith @ susansmithz@hotmail.com; US: 1-858-240-2360; MX: 661-100-6066.

Every Third Wednesday, 10 am, Meeting of Rosarito Sister Cities at City Hall, Fojadores Room, 2nd floor. Information and RSVP: FRAO@Rosarito.gob.mx.

Every Third Wednesday (except December) 1:00 – 4:00 pm, Flying Samaritan’s Outrageous Bingo at Popotla Jr. Restaurant (across from El Nino), Food and Drink specials; free parking behind restaurant; Six games, 4 cards for $10; Karen: kajomc@yahoo.coojm; (US) 1-818-515-0067l (MX) 664-609-3419.

Every Last Wednesday, 11:30 am, Wellness Wednesday Workshop “Intentionally Aging Gracefully” with Erendira Abel at IMAC a Abelard Rodriguez Park (behind Banamex). $6, and pre-registration is required. Info: wellnesshealingliving@gmail.com; (US) 1-619-737-2453, (MX) 661-614-6036.

Every Thursday. 8:30 am. Local Board of Realtors (APIR) meets at Oceana Grill. Good place for buyers or sellers to find a Realtor

Every Thursday, 10:30 am, Learn Spanish “Naturally” with Erendira Abel at Rosarito Beach Christian Church. $5, and pre-registration is required. Info: wellnesshealingliving@gmail.com; (US) 1-619-737-2453, (MX) 661-614-6036.

Every Second Thursday. 10 am. Cruz Roja Volunteers, Rosarito Chapter General Meeting at Popotla Restaurant. www.cruzrojarosarito.org.mx; President: Mary Moreno, miqueridomx@yahoo.com.

Every Third Thursday. 10 am. General Meeting for FRAO, Foreign Residents Assistance Office. Open to the public. Calafia Hotel.  Speaker’s presentation. FRAO@Rosarito.gob.mx.

Every Fourth Thursday of the month, 12 pm, Baja Babes, the Rosarito Chapter of the Red Hat Society for ladies over 50 monthly luncheon. Each month a different restaurant. margit@prodigy.net.mx.

Every Friday. 4pm.  Spanish class main library, by IMAC, in Abelardo Rodriguez park behind BanaMex. Free but donation appreciated.

Every Saturday, 10:00 am at IMAC Central park. Chess for all ages. www.facebook.com/IMAC Rosarito.

 Every First Saturday. 10 am. United Society of Baja California (USBC) general meeting at Casa Blanca Restaurant, Rosarito Beach Hotel. Good info for the English speaking community of charitable, community service and social organizations. www.unitedsocietyofbaja.org. 661-614-1113.

Every First Saturday. Noon-sundown. Open Studio Art Walk, a free tour of galleries in Rosarito Beach Hotel commercial center. Meet artists at work in their studios. pacothepainter@hotmail.com

Every Third Saturday. 1pm. USBC, United Society of Baja California, monthly potluck dinner, at La Maroma sports bar, across from Burger King. Different theme every month. Usually live entertainment. Free. Membership $20 per year.

Every day but one day at a time AA Grupo Gringo meets daily #16 Mar Meditteraneo (two blocks behind Del Mar Beach Club). Saturday, 3:00; Sunday, Monday, Thursday: 10:00 am; Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday: 6:00 pm.  Additional meetings in Cantamar (just south of the footbridge) Tuesday and Friday, 10:00 am.  661-614-1678.

November 16, Friday, 9 am – 4 pm; 11th Biennial Baja California Photo Contest and Exhibit at CEART Rosarito. For rules and information of submitting photos, go to Facebook.com/ CEART Playas de Rosarito. 661-100-6338.

November 21, Wednesday, 6:30 pm; Author Karla Contreras presents her novel, “Dios Quiere Hablarte” at CEART Rosarito. Free. 661-100-6338. Facebook.com/ CEART Playas de Rosarito.

November 22, Thursday; Thanksgiving Dinner at Bobby’s By The Sea (k 43); 3 seatings: 2:00 – 4:30 pm, 5:00 – 7:30 pm, or 8:00 – 10:00 pm. $14.95 includes turkey, all the sides, pumpkin pie, and welcome champagne. Reservations required! www.bobbysatk43.com; 661-114-6278.

November 22, Thursday, 3:00 AND 4:00 pm; Thanksgiving Dinner at Popotla Restaurant. $14.50 includes Turkey, all the sides, and pumpkin pie. Reservations required. 661-612-1505.

November 22, Thursday, 2 – 4 pm; Thanksgiving Potluck at Magana’s Tacos, Primo Tapia. Turkey will be provided. You bring a side to share. Facebook.com/ Maganas Restaurant Bar.

November 24, Saturday, 9 am – 4:30 pm; “Encuentro de Industrias Culturas y Creativas 2018” at CEART Rosarito. Featuring Paolo Mercado Espinoza and Arturo Sastre Blanco. $400 pesos. Facebook.com/ Encuentro de Industrias Culturales y Creativas.

November 25, Sunday, 11 am – 2 pm; Battle the Bartender Bloody Mary Contest at Magana’s Tacos. Information: 01-646-155-0586. Facebook.com/ Maganas Restaurant Bar.

November 27, Tuesday, 8:30 am – 12 pm; 3rd Annual Feminine Culture Conference at CEART Rosarito. Subjects include personal safey and security, domestic violence, and more. Information: mcfrosarito@gmail.com or 661-850-5957.

December 2, Sunday, 2 – 6pm; Dance Party at Tempest Trading, (k 40.5). Free. DJ playing rock & roll, disco, blues, and more. Facebook.com/ Tempest Trading Baja.

December 5, Wednesday, 1 pm; Flying Samaritan’s Annual White Elephant Gift Exchange Luncheon. Bring a $20+ gift to swap. Donation of $15 includes luncheon. RSVP: susansmithz@hotmail.com; 661-100-6066 (MX); 1-858-240-2360 (US).

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